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Since November 2016, unrelenting violence in the north eastern governorate of Raqqa has displaced 107,000 people. Intensified attacks and shelling have destroyed infrastructure and shattered civilian lives.

Families are seeking safety in poorly-equipped temporary shelters and camps in the area. They are living in dire conditions with little access to basic services.

UNICEF is responding to the needs of vulnerable families, trucking 975,000 litres of water daily to 120,000 internally displaced people in camps in Raqqa and Hassakeh, including Mabrouka, Al-Hol and Ain Issa. UNICEF has installed latrines, showers and water storage tanks in the camps and is distributing family hygiene kits to protect children against waterborne diseases.

Mobile health clinics have been set up to provide primary health care, including vaccinations for children and their mothers. Nutritional supplements are distributed on a regular basis.

UNICEF has also set up child-friendly spaces for learning and playing, and is providing psychological support to help children cope with the traumas they have faced. This also helps children regain a sense of structure and normality into their lives.

In the makeshift camp at Ain Issa, 50 km north of the Raqqa, more than 6,000 people live in harsh conditions. Numbers continue to rise as violence escalates in the area.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

A  mother helps her daughter wash her hair with a water jug, in Ain Issa camp, northeastern Syria.

Since November 2016, unrelenting violence in the north eastern governorate of Raqqa has displaced 107,000 people. Intensified attacks and shelling have destroyed infrastructure and shattered civilian lives.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

A child collects water in Ain Issa camp, north eastern Syria.

UNICEF is responding to the needs of vulnerable families by trucking 975,000 litres of water daily to 120,000 internally displaced people in camps in Raqqa and Hassakeh, including Mabrouka, Al-Hol and Ain Issa.

UNICEF has installed latrines, showers and water storage tanks in the camps and is distributing family hygiene kits to protect children from waterborne diseases.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

Since November 2016, escalating violence in the north eastern governorate of Raqqa has displaced 107,000 people. Intensified attacks and shelling have destroyed infrastructure and shattered civilian lives.

Families are seeking safety in poorly equipped temporary shelters and camps in the area. They are living in harsh conditions with no access to basic services.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

Bilal, 10, arrived in Ain Issa camp with his family three days ago, after a tough two-day journey.

“We stayed with a family in the mountains for one night, we were all exhausted from walking and carrying our blankets and food,” says Bilal who was forced to drop out of school in Grade 1.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

Since November 2016, unrelenting violence in the northeastern governorate of Raqqa has displaced 107,000 people. Intensified attacks and shelling have destroyed infrastructure and shattered civilian lives.

Families are seeking safety in poorly-equipped temporary shelters and camps in the area. They are living in dire conditions with lack of access to services.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

A child collects water in Ain Issa makeshift camp, northeastern Syria.

UNICEF is working to respond to the needs of vulnerable families, trucking 975,000 litres of safe water daily to 120,000 internally displaced people in camps in Raqqa and Hassakeh, including Mabrouka, Al-Hol and Ain Issa. UNICEF has installed latrines, shower units and water storage tanks in the camps and is distributing family hygiene kits to protect children against waterborne diseases.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

Since November 2016, unrelenting violence in the northeastern governorate of Raqqa has displaced 107,000 people. Intensified attacks and shelling have destroyed infrastructure and shattered civilian lives.

Families are seeking safety in poorly-equipped temporary shelters and camps in the area. They are living in dire conditions with lack of access to services.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

Hiba, 12, and her family has just arrived in Ain Issa camp from rural Raqqa, where violence has recently escalated.

“I wasn’t scared on the way, I kept thinking that once we get here, I will be safe,” says Hiba who has already braved airstrikes and mines in her few years of life.

“I can read and write but with difficulty,” adds Hiba who has lost four years of education. “I have forgotten almost everything I’ve learned but not my classmates.”

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

Safaa, 20, carries a jerry can of water back to her family in Ain Issa camp, northeastern Syria. The family arrived three days ago, fleeing the violence in Raqqa, and have been living out in the open without basic services.

UNICEF is responding to the needs of vulnerable families by trucking 975,000 litres of water daily to 120,000 internally displaced people in camps in Raqqa and Hassakeh, including Mabrouka, Al-Hol and Ain Issa.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

A baby sleeps in his family’s tent in Ain Issa makeshift camp, northeastern Syria.

Since November 2016, unrelenting violence in the northeastern governorate of Raqqa has displaced 107,000 people. Intensified attacks and shelling have destroyed infrastructure and shattered civilian lives.

Families are seeking safety in poorly-equipped temporary shelters and camps in the area. They are living in dire conditions with lack of access to services.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

In the makeshift camp in Ain Issa, 50 km north of the city of Raqqa, more than 6,000 people live in basic conditions. Numbers continue to rise as violence escalates in the area.

UNICEF is working to respond to the needs of vulnerable families, trucking 975,000 litres of safe water daily to 120,000 internally displaced people in camps in Raqqa and Hassakeh, including Mabrouka, Al-Hol and Ain Issa. UNICEF has installed latrines, shower units and water storage tanks in the camps and is distributing family hygiene kits to protect children against waterborne diseases.

Mobile health clinics have been set up to provide primary health care, including immunization services for children and their mothers, while much-needed nutritional supplements are distributed on a regular basis.

UNICEF has also set up learning spaces and child-friendly spaces, providing psychological support to help children cope with the trauma they have faced – and to introduce some structure and normality into their lives.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

Horriya, 12, arrived with her family in Ain Issa camp four days ago, following a three-day journey from Raqqa.

“I wasn’t afraid on the way. We heard airplanes and shelling but we’re used to that. We see them and hear them every day,” says Horriya who has lost four years of education.

Here, she fetches water for her family.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

14 year-old Ali arrived with his family to Ain Issa camp almost three weeks ago, fleeing violence in Raqqa.

More than 6,000 people live in harsh conditions at the camp, with families forced to share tents or sleep out in the open. Numbers continue to rise as violence escalates in the area.

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©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

Asmaa, 14, arrived with her parents and seven siblings to Ain Issa camp 10 days ago, fleeing the violence in Raqqa. She and her family have been displaced three times.

“Life in Raqqa was very difficult, we lived under airstrikes and shelling. We were scared all the time,” says Asmaa who had to drive through mine fields with her family to make it to Ain Issa.

“I miss school so much and I want to go back one day to become a teacher,” adds Asmaa who has lost four years of her education.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

Families continue to arrive with their belongings at Ain Issa makeshift camp in northeastern Syria. Since November 2016, unrelenting violence in the northeastern governorate of Raqqa has displaced 107,000 people. Intensified attacks and shelling have destroyed infrastructure and shattered civilian lives.

Families are seeking safety in poorly-equipped temporary shelters and camps in the area. They are living in dire conditions with lack of access to services.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

©UNICEF/ Syria 2017/ Delil Souleiman

 

UNICEF is working to respond to the needs of vulnerable families, trucking 975,000 litres of safe water daily to 120,000 internally displaced people in camps in Raqqa and Hassakeh, including Mabrouka, Al-Hol and Ain Issa. UNICEF has installed latrines, shower units and water storage tanks in the camps and is distributing family hygiene kits to protect children against waterborne diseases.

Share and raise awareness on #ChildrenofSyria
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