Share and raise awareness on #ChildrenofSyria
Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Share on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0

The already dire humanitarian situation inside the besieged east Ghouta is worsening.  According to reports basic commodities such as fuel are mostly unavailable, the few supplies are too expensive and families cannot afford to buy, making conditions difficult for survival. An estimated 180,000 children have been living under siege in East Gouta since 2013.

6V6A1562

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

Lina is one of the millions of children who are growing up knowing nothing but conflict.

Lina is five. She lives with her grandfather in a partially damaged house in the besieged east Ghouta in Rural Damascus.

“Lina’s father went missing few years ago. She remembers him and calls me ‘dad’,” Lina’s grandfather says. “We don’t have any source of income. I cannot afford buying a cookie for this little girl,” he adds.

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

Akram, 17, sells fuel on a street stall in the besieged east Ghouta in Rural Damascus.

“I left school three years ago after I failed the seventh grade. I started working with my father at the vegetable market. My father and I provide for our family the best we can, but they are surviving with just the minimum because of the tight siege,” Akram says.

Humanitarian situation in east Ghouta continues to deteriorate. According to reports, fighting, displacement, and the spike in prices due to the tightened siege in the past three months are further increasing the suffering of over 400,000 people living in the enclave, including over 180,000 children.

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

Ayman stands at his father’s fuel stall with a background sign “credits not allowed” in besieged east Ghouta in Rural Damascus.

“I work with my father. We sell fuel,” nine-year old Ayman says. As in many areas under siege, families in east Ghouta burn plastic waste and turn them to fuel to overcome fuel shortages.  “I work after I finish school until the evening but I still want to study because I want to become an engineer when I grow up,” he adds.

Humanitarian situation in east Ghouta continues to deteriorate. According to reports, fighting, displacement, and a spike in prices due to the tightened siege in the last few months are further exacerbating the suffering of over 400,000 people living in the enclave, including over 180,000 children.

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

Maher, 14 years old, is the eldest of his three siblings. After his father passed away, Maher became the only bread winner for his family.

“I left school when I was in the sixth grade after we left our home and my father died. We needed an income to survive. My daily allowance from my work here is between 500 to 700 SYP [US$ 1 to US$ 1.5]. It is barely enough to buy a pack of bread,” Maher says.

The price of one bread pack (8 pieces of bread) costs between SYP 650 to 800 which many families cannot afford.

Humanitarian situation in east Ghouta continues to deteriorate. According to reports, fighting, displacement, and a spike in prices due to the tightened siege in the last few months are further exacerbating the suffering of over 400,000 people living in the enclave, including over 180,000 children.

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

Maher works with Abu-Muhammad the bakery’s owner at a town in besieged east Ghouta in Rural Damascus.

“After a very long search for a job, I was able to find this one,” Maher says.

Maher gets paid US$ 1.5 a day.   Like many children affected by the war in Syria, Maher had to leave school to become his family’s sole breadwinner.

Humanitarian situation in east Ghouta continues to deteriorate. According to reports, fighting, displacement, and a spike in prices due to the tightened siege in the last few months are further exacerbating the suffering of over 400,000 people living in the enclave, including over 180,000 children.

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

Abdullah, six, stands in front of a wall where he and his sister were pulled from under the rubbles after it was hit during a shelling.

“I was playing with Marah and suddenly everything went black. I only woke up in the hospital with my father standing next to me,” Abdullah says.

Humanitarian situation in east Ghouta continues to deteriorate. According to reports, fighting, displacement, and a spike in prices due to the tightened siege in the last few months are further exacerbating the suffering of over 400,000 people living in the enclave, including over 180,000 children.

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

“We stayed with my parents for few days until I was able to fix the house a little so we can move back,” Abdullah’s father says. “It was terrifying. The wall collapsed right on top of my two children but luckily they suffered only minor injuries,” he adds.

Humanitarian situation in east Ghouta continues to deteriorate. According to reports, fighting, displacement, and a spike in prices due to the tightened siege in the last few months are further exacerbating the suffering of over 400,000 people living in the enclave, including over 180,000 children.

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

Imad, 10, waits for customers to sell vegetables at a street in east Ghouta.

“I still go to school. I am in Grade 4.  I missed one year of school. I come here to sell vegetables after school when my dad leaves to the wholesale market to bring some more,” Imad adds.

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

Wael, 14, is a straight-A student at his school. He stands in front of his father’s shop, behind the beans he planted in metal barrels.

“My dad put the barrels and filled it with soil to protect us from a shelling. That’s when I thought to plant beans in the barrels so we don’t feel hungry anymore,” Wael says.

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

Fourteen-year old Wael, stands next to the metal barrels bean plants growing in it.

“Wael is in a state of fear after witnessing an incident where many people were killed in a shelling at a local market” his father says. “So I put these barrels to give him some sense of safety and protection from shelling.”

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

©UNICEF/2017/Syria/Rural Damascus/Amer Almohibany

 

Children play inside a burned car in east Ghouta.

Humanitarian situation in east Ghouta continues to deteriorate. According to reports, fighting, displacement, and a spike in prices due to the tightened siege in the last few months are further exacerbating the suffering of over 400,000 people living in the enclave, including over 180,000 children.

Share and raise awareness on #ChildrenofSyria
Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Share on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0
Close
Go top