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©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

9 year-old Mohammad fled his home in the town of Sbeneh in rural Damascus four years ago when violence escalated and sought refuge with his family in Lebanon. Even though Mohammad was attending school in Lebanon, the different education systems meant that he had to re-do Grade 1 upon his return to Syria last year.

Mohammad now attends Grade 2 in the “Al- Najha School” in rural Damascus, where he now lives with his family.

“I want to work in construction when I grow up, to help rebuild everyone’s houses.” He said.

The school, welcoming more than 800 students including 100 internally displaced children was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 2 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

14 year-old Atallah was in Grade 5 when escalating violence near his home in Deir-ez-zor northeastern Syria, forced him to quit his education and stay at home. Later, when ISIS took over the area, schools were closed down, posing a new challenge for Atallah’s education.

Having not seen the inside of a classroom in 5 years, Atallah fled with his family and sought refuge in rural Damascus where he now attends Grades 5 and 6 under UNICEF’s ‘Curriculum b’ programme in the ‘third Ghizlaniya’ school. The accelerated learning proramme is especially designed for children like Atallah who lost years of education due to conflict and displacement, to catch up with their peers. Consisting of 3 educational levels, the programme combines two years in one, allowing children to finish their basic education in half the required time.

“I like the new curriculum here, it’s easy to understand and the teachers are so nice to us,” said Atallah. “Back there, I only knew how to add and subtract, but here I learned to multiply and do complex math problems.” He added.

The school, welcoming more than 2000 children, most of whom forced to flee their homes, was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 3 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment. UNICEF also provided 3 prefabricated classrooms for the ‘Curriculum b’ programme, allowing more children to return to school and reintegrate with their peers.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

14 year-old Ghadeer was forced to flee her home in eastern Ghouta almost 4 years ago and sought refuge with her family in Al- Ghizlaniya, rural Damascus.

Since her displacement, Ghadeer stayed out of school and found it increasingly difficult to return with each passing year.

This year, Ghadeer enrolled for Grades 5 and 6 under UNICEF’s ‘Curriculum b’ programme in the ‘third Ghizlaniya’ school. The accelerated learning proramme is especially designed for children like Ghadeer who lost years of education due to conflict and displacement, to catch up with their peers. Consisting of 3 educational levels, the programme combines two years in one, allowing children to finish their basic education in half the required time.

“Ghadeer is a very smart student,” said Alaa, Ghadeer’s math teacher. “She understands everything quickly. When I taught them fractions, she was the first to solve complex problems.” She added.

The school, welcoming more than 2000 children, most of whom forced to flee their homes, was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 3 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment. UNICEF also provided 3 prefabricated classrooms for the ‘Curriculum b’ programme, allowing more children to return to school and reintegrate with their peers.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

14 year-old Marwa and her family were forced to flee their home in Qusair, rural Homs almost 4 years ago and had been without schooling since then.

This year, Marwa enrolled for Grades 5 and 6 under UNICEF’s ‘Curriculum b’ programme in the ‘third Ghizlaniya’ school. The accelerated learning proramme is especially designed for children like Marwa who lost years of education due to conflict and displacement, to catch up with their peers. Consisting of 3 educational levels, the programme combines two years in one, allowing children to finish their basic education in half the required time.

“I made new friends here, they became like my sisters,” said Marwa. “The curriculum here is easy to understand and the teachers explain it really well.” She added.

The school, welcoming more than 2000 children, most of whom forced to flee their homes, was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 3 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment. UNICEF also provided 3 prefabricated classrooms for the ‘Curriculum b’ programme, allowing more children to return to school and reintegrate with their peers.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

Children at the “Al- Najha School” in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 800 students including 100 internally displaced children was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 2 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

Children at the “Al- Najha School” in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 800 students including 100 internally displaced children was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 2 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

Children at the “Al- Najha School” in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 800 students including 100 internally displaced children was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 2 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

Children at the “Al- Najha School” in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 800 students including 100 internally displaced children was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 2 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

A girl at the “Al- Najha School” in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 800 students including 100 internally displaced children was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 2 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

A boy at the “third Ghizlaniya” school in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 2000 children, most of whom forced to flee their homes, was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 3 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment. UNICEF also provided 3 prefabricated classrooms for the ‘Curriculum b’ programme, an accelerated learning programme allowing more children to return to school and reintegrate with their peers.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

Children at the “third Ghizlaniya” school in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 2000 children, most of whom forced to flee their homes, was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 3 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment. UNICEF also provided 3 prefabricated classrooms for the ‘Curriculum b’, an accelerated learning programme allowing more children to return to school and reintegrate with their peers.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

A child during math class at the “third Ghizlaniya” school in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 2000 children, most of whom forced to flee their homes, was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 3 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment. UNICEF also provided 3 prefabricated classrooms for the ‘Curriculum b’, an accelerated learning programme allowing more children to return to school and reintegrate with their peers.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

An overly crowded classroom at the “third Ghizlaniya” school in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 2000 children, most of whom forced to flee their homes, was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 3 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment. UNICEF also provided 3 prefabricated classrooms for the ‘Curriculum b’, an accelerated learning programme allowing more children to return to school and reintegrate with their peers.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

An overly crowded classroom at the “third Ghizlaniya” school in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 2000 children, most of whom forced to flee their homes, was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 3 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment. UNICEF also provided 3 prefabricated classrooms for the ‘Curriculum b’, an accelerated learning programme allowing more children to return to school and reintegrate with their peers.

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

©UNICEF/ Syria 2016/ Ranim Al- Malek

 

Children at the “third Ghizlaniya” school in rural Damascus. The school, welcoming more than 2000 children, most of whom forced to flee their homes, was overcrowded, affecting the quality of education these children receive. Thanks to funding by the Lionel Messi foundation, UNICEF provided the school with 3 prefabricated classrooms, allowing for additional learning space and a better quality learning environment. UNICEF also provided 3 prefabricated classrooms for the ‘Curriculum b’, an accelerated learning programme allowing more children to return to school and reintegrate with their peers.

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