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الخبر باللغة العربية

PRESS RELEASE

Borehole 2 in Zaatari camp where tanks fill up from the borehole and transfer to assembly points around the camp to provide fresh drinking water to Syrian refugees. ©UNICEF/Jordan-2014

Borehole 2 in Zaatari camp where tanks fill up from the borehole and transfer to assembly points around the camp to provide fresh drinking water to Syrian refugees. ©UNICEF/Jordan-2014

AMMAN, 23 February 2015 – Six members of the German Parliamentary Group “Arabic Speaking Countries in the Middle East” visited Za’atari Camp on Thursday, 19 February. The delegation met refugees and humanitarian actors, and observed UNICEF’s water supply and sanitation activities.

In December 2014, the Government of Germany, through KFW Development Bank, provided a new grant of EURO 15 million (US $18.5 million) to UNICEF Jordan to sustain essential water, sanitation and hygiene services of vulnerable Syrian refugees in Za’atari refugee camp in the years ahead.

This contribution will improve the water quality, sustainability, access and long-term cost effectiveness in providing water, and in managing waste water through the installation of a water network and waste water system in Za’atari camp.

The German Ambassador to Jordan, H.E. Ralph Tarraf, emphasized that after 4 years of temporary humanitarian solutions and no end of the refugee presence ahead, it is time to invest in sustainable solutions to provide the inhabitants of the camp with water and sanitation. “With this investment Germany also wants to contribute to the cost effectiveness of water and sanitation services and the protection of the environment,” he added.

Water tank at Zaatari Borehole 2 filling up with clean drinking water. Scene of the camp in the background. ©UNICEF/Jordan-2014

Water tank at Zaatari Borehole 2 filling up with clean drinking water. Scene of the camp in the background. ©UNICEF/Jordan-2014

“The continued generous support from the Government of Germany is helping UNICEF provide much needed health, education, protection and water and sanitation services to vulnerable Syrian children in Jordan,” said the UNICEF Jordan Representative, Robert Jenkins. “Critically, this large contribution will ensure sustainability and cost effectiveness in the medium to long-term. It will address key issues such as water quality, equitable access to safe water and environmental contamination, as well as reducing public health risks,” Jenkins added.

The German funding will support the construction of a water network that will result in the more efficient use of water resources and will ensure more equitable distribution to families across the camp. The contribution will also support the construction of a sewage system in Za’atari covering all camp districts and connecting households to the waste water treatment plant in the camp. The collection of the household wastewater into a sewerage network will reduce the potential for any public health risks posed by private facilities, as well as alleviate fears of potential sewage infiltration into the underlying aquifer.

UNICEF Jordan and its partners currently provide 3.5 million liters of safe water daily to some 80,000 Syrians living in Za’atari camp. In addition, UNICEF de-sludges and trucks 1.85 million liters of waste water out of the camp and removes approximately 750 metric tonnes of solid waste every day.

Germany is a key donor to UNICEF Jordan and has provided in total 60.2 million EUR since end of 2012 for education, psychosocial support, health and water, sanitation and hygiene services in refugee camps and host communities.

For more information please contact:

  • Miraj Pradhan: Chief of Communication – Tel: +962 (0) 790 214 191 – mpradhan@unicef.org
  • Samir Badran: Communication Specialist – Tel: +962 (0) 796 926 180 – sbadran@unicef.org

 

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